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Mumies Play from Badby, Northants. - 1913-1916

R.J.E.Tiddy (1923) pp.222-223

Context

Location: 
Badby
SP5539
Time of Occurrence: 
Christmas
Collective name: 
Mumies

Source

Author: 
R.J.E.Tiddy
Title: 
The Mummers' Play
Publication: 
Oxford, University Press, 1923, pp.222-223

Cast

[Introducer]
John Fenn / Mr Fenn
Molly
Turkish Snipe / Old Balled Turk
Doctor
[Musician]
Father Christmas

Text

{Mumies.}

[Introducer]

In comes I that's never been before
Six merry actors stand at your door.
They can merrily dance and sing
And by your leaf they shall walk in.
Walk in John Fenn.

[John Fenn]

My name is not John Fenn. My name is Mr Fenn.
I fought three battles,
one at home and two abroad
and I killed the king.

{In comes Molly; she says}

[Molly]

you have not killed the king,
for I am the mother of the king.
The king is still alive
and Old balled Turk shall have his own way
and the king shall not be destroyed.

[Turkish Snipe]

In comes I the Turkish Snipe.
I came from Turkey for to fight.
If any one think woll to fight,
Draw his sword and try his might.

{They fight.}

I speared him through the heart and thigh.
Oh I wonder if there is a doctor to be found,
to cure this poor bleeding boy that lays upon the ground.

{In comes the doctor.}

[Doctor]

Of course there is a doctor to be found
to cure this lad upon the ground.

[Unidentified Interrogator]

What will you cure him for ?

[Doctor]

£50.

[Unidentified Interrogator]

Set to work.
What has he the matter ?

[Doctor]

He is got the hip, the pip, the palsy and the gout
The pain within and the pain without.

{Then he gives him some medicine and pills, and the lad rises up.}

[Musician]

In comes I that's never been yet,
My head so big my wits so small
I'll play you a tune to please you all.
My father killed a great fat hog and that you plainly see
for I have got the bladder tied on my heardy girdy.

[Father Christmas]

In comes poor old Father Christmas, I have not long to stay
I hope you will remember me before I go away
welcome now welcome not
welcome poor old Father Christmas shall never be forgot.

{Then they sing songs.}

Notes